Law, Justice and Journalism

Archive for May, 2012|Monthly archive page

Introducing the Crime, Justice and Society Research Group

In City University London, Events, Justice, Law on May 28, 2012 at 10:10 am

This group, based at City University London, was established to research and examine issues relating to the interactions between the law, its application and representation (for example in the media) and the agencies dealing with it. The research areas are: Criminal Law, Criminal Justice and Socio-Legal studies.

Therefore, the group aims at including academics from both the Law School and the School of Criminology. We hold a series of seminars at City University with speakers who present research papers in areas such as: the changing nature of news media-police chief relations, the criminal justice system in the socio-legal context and historical perspectives on corporate liability.

Our mission is to contribute to the enhancement of the Criminal Law and Criminal Justice research cluster via seminars, conferences and workshops that focus on innovative perspectives on the contextualization of the law and criminal justice system.

For further information please contact the group convener Dr. Riccardo Montana (Riccardo.Montana.1@city.ac.uk).

More information here.

Upcoming seminars

  • “Phone-hacking, Riots, Looting, Gangs and Police Chiefs: Sir Hugh Orde’s ‘Trial by Media'”, Dr. Chris Greer and Prof. Eugene McLaughlin, Wednesday 30 May, City University London

Past seminars

  • “Moral Panics and Punitiveness: Putting a Criminal Justice System in Context”, Dr. Riccardo Montana, 25 April 2012
  • “Corporations and Individual Businesspersons in Domestic and International Criminal Law”, Dr. Grietje Baars, 28 March 2012
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George Brock: Leveson – how to avoid the pitfalls of “better mousetrap” press regulation

In Comment, Journalism, Media regulation on May 17, 2012 at 9:10 am

Professor George Brock

Towards the end of next month, the Leveson Inquiry into the British press will turn from its current, revelatory phase about media relationships with politicians and address again the knotty question of regulating journalism.

The inquiry’s most basic dilemma hasn’t changed: how to prevent and discourage the wrongs which have occurred without tipping over into state control of the news media.

When he has grown bored and irritated with an editor waffling vaguely about how things will be improved by a few light adjustments to the present rules, Lord Justice Leveson usually asks one of two questions and sometimes both: what would you actually do?

Will what you suggest command public confidence? Next month will bring forth a slew of ideas for regulation designed to work better than the much-abused self-regulation of the past. Legal and media experts are busy putting the finishing touches to better mousetraps.

Read the post in full on George Brock’s blog here.